Friday, October 6, 2017

October 2017

This month’s unit is titled “My Community.” The unit provides lessons and activities that address the importance of being an active participant within the community by addressing topics including community resources, community rules and positive citizenship skills. As we assist our young adults in the transition from school to work, it is necessary that they receive exposure to community living skills. In this unit, young adults will be provided with the tools needed to learn about the community so that they can become active and informed citizens.

The unit stories help young adults learn the importance of being an active part of the community. In the first story, a young man utilizes his wheelchair and communication device to independently run errands within the community. By staying organized and planning ahead, he is able to complete his errands in one trip. In the second story, a young girl who communicates in her own way, makes choices as she shops with her mother. She enjoys the satisfaction that comes as a result of being a valued member of her community. Three articles offer additional information and opportunities to learn about the community by exploring transportation options, the characteristics of a good citizen and important places within the community.

Regular monthly lessons offer the opportunity to practice community living skills using various daily living scenarios. Banking and budgeting lessons explore the concept of wants versus needs. In these lessons, the importance of budgeting for needs before spending money on wants is stressed. Daily living skills are addressed within the monthly cooking lesson. The cooking lesson offers five recipes in which young adults can express their opinions on various kitchen skills, recipes and food choices that are introduced. The daily social trivia lesson stresses social skill development by, offering team members the opportunity to apply their understanding of community living skills to real-life social scenarios.

Employment continues to be a regular focus for several lessons each month. Lessons include exploring different jobs, reading job ads, completing job applications and practicing interview skills. Simple, realistic scenarios address job skills and interactions at work.

Wednesday, August 30, 2017

September 2017

Mind Your Manners

This unit provides lessons and activities about the importance of recognizing the difference between good and bad manners including activities in the Transition Passport: Personal Life/ Everyday Communication. As we assist our young adults in the transition from school to work, it is necessary that they receive training in how to use good manners in social situations. Being polite and using good manners affects how others treat you. Knowing how to use good manners is an important skill to have to support employment. Some people may need opportunities to practice these skills. This unit will provide our young adults with the tools needed to learn about the consequences of having good and bad manners. 

The unit stories help young adults learn the importance of using good manners. In the first story, Tori is visiting Matt’s house. This story highlights the importance of using good manners when visiting someone’s home. In the second story, Matt visits Tori’s house. This second story provides the setting for using bad manners. Three articles offer more information and activities that give our young adults the opportunity to learn what are considered good and bad manners and why. 

Regular monthly lessons are provided which offer the opportunity to practice the skills needed to use good manners in social situations. Manners are addressed in banking and budgeting where the importance of budgeting for needs before spending money on wants is stressed. Daily living skills involved in cooking are part of a regular monthly lesson offering five recipes where our young adults can practice the skills needed to use proper etiquette and polite manners while eating. Social and communication skills are the focus of lessons presenting daily social trivia scenarios, offering more opportunity for our young adults to practice skills needed to use good manners. 

Employment continues to be a regular focus for several lessons each month. Lessons include exploring different jobs, reading job ads, completing job applications and practicing interview skills. Simple, realistic scenarios address job skills and interactions at work. Job skills are emphasized as team members take on various tasks. 

Monday, April 24, 2017

May 2017

This month’s unit titled, "Home Sweet Home," addresses the topic of potential living options, The unit provides lessons and activities about the importance of thinking about where your young adult wants to live and the types of supports they will need including activities in the Transition Passport: Personal Life/ Evaluation Tools. As we assist our young adults in the transition from school to work, it is necessary that they receive training in daily living and money skills. Living independently means that they may need to learn new skills. Knowing how to take care of oneself, money and a home are skills needed for independent living. Some people may need support people to come in to help with some of these skills. This unit will provide our young adults with the tools needed to learn about how to choose a home that best meets their needs.

The unit stories help young adults learn the importance of learning about future living options. In the first story, Katie is moving from a care center into her own home. This has been a dream for Katie. Her parents and support team work hard to find Katie a home. Katie’s house needs some changes to meet Katie’s needs. With a lot of hard work and planning, Katie’s dream comes true. In the second story, Kevin is researching future living options for himself. He is thinking about either continuing to live with his parents, moving into an apartment or moving into a group home. Kevin thinks about the good and bad things about each option. Three articles offer more information and activities that give our young adults the opportunity to learn about planning for future living and the skills needed to live independently.

Regular monthly lessons are provided which offer the opportunity to practice the skills needed to care for yourself and your home. Home needs are addressed in banking and budgeting where the importance of budgeting for needs before spending money on wants is stressed. Daily living skills involved in cooking are part of a regular monthly lesson offering five recipes where our young adults can practice the skills needed to cook and care for themselves. Social and communication skills are the focus of lessons presenting daily social trivia scenarios offering more opportunity for our young adults to practice skills needed to care for a home.

Employment continues to be a regular focus for several lessons each month. Lessons include exploring different jobs, reading job ads, completing job applications and practicing interview skills. Simple, realistic scenarios address job skills and interactions at work.

Monday, April 3, 2017

April 2017

The topic of job skills is presented in this month’s unit titled, “Work It!” The unit provides lessons and activities focusing on skills needed to get and keep a job. Activities from the Transition Passport: Daily Living/Vocational Tools are incorporated. As we assist our young adults in the transition from school to work, it is necessary that they receive training in job skills. Knowing how to get a job, knowing how to keep a job and how to have a good work attitude are important components to a successful work experience. This unit will provide our young adults with the tools needed to explore and find job options that are available to them.

The unit stories help young adults learn about skills that will help them get and keep a job. In the first story, a young man wants to have a job and earn money like his parents. His team thinks he’s ready to go to work. He works with VR to determine what type of job will suit his special set of skills. Team members will be exposed to a variety of activities they can participate in to get ready for the transition from school to work. In the second story, team members are introduced to the skill of making decisions. Team members are introduced to good and bad work decisions. They learn that these decisions can affect their job or even cause them to lose a job.

Regular monthly lessons are provided which offer the opportunity to practice the skills needed to get and keep a job. Working can lead to earning a paycheck which is addressed in banking and budgeting, where the importance of being smart with money is stressed. Daily living skills involved in cooking are part of a regular monthly lesson offering five recipes where our young adults can practice following directions to complete the recipes provided. Social and communication skills are the focus of lessons presenting daily social trivia scenarios offering more opportunity for our young adults to practice skills needed to make good choices related to job skills and getting along with co-workers.

Employment continues to be a regular focus for several lessons each month. Lessons include exploring different jobs, reading job ads, completing job applications and practicing interview skills. Simple, realistic scenarios address job skills and interactions at work.

Friday, February 24, 2017

March 2017

The topic of phone etiquette is presented in this month’s unit titled, “Who’s Calling?” The unit provides lessons and activities focusing on phone manners and uses. Activities from the Transition Passport: Daily Living/Using the Phone are incorporated. As we assist our young adults in the transition from school to work, it is necessary that they receive training in phone etiquette. Knowing how to make a call, how to answer the phone, and how to use appropriate phone manners are important components to phone etiquette. This unit will provide our young adults with the tools needed to learn how to appropriately use a phone for communication and to gain information.

The unit stories help young adults learn the importance of phone manners and how a phone is used for personal calls and service-related situations. In the first story, two housemates are working together to solve phone issues. They understand the need for using manners during phone calls and the need for taking messages. In the second story, two housemates have a problem. They need to decide who to call for help and how to find the phone number. Their phone is used as a tool to help solve their problems.

Regular monthly lessons are provided which offer the opportunity to practice the skills needed to know how to use a phone and the manners that should be used. Phone usage is addressed in banking and budgeting where phone related bills are paid. Daily living skills involved in cooking are part of a regular monthly lesson offering five recipes where our young adults can practice appropriate manners and etiquette while cooking and eating. Social and communication skills are the focus of lessons presenting daily social trivia scenarios offering more opportunity for our young adults to practice skills needed to make good choices related to phone usage and manners.

Employment continues to be a regular focus for several lessons each month. Lessons include exploring different jobs, reading job ads, completing job applications and practicing interview skills. Simple, realistic scenarios address job skills and interactions at work.

Wednesday, January 25, 2017

February 2017

The topic of home cleaning routines and organization is presented in this month’s unit titled, “Housekeeping.” The unit provides lessons and activities about the importance of using a cleaning plan to help schedule and organize everyday cleaning tasks including activities in the Transition Passport: Daily Living/At Home evaluation tools. As we assist our young adults in the transition from school to work, it is necessary that they receive training in cleaning and organization skills. Housekeeping skills begin with making a plan, knowing your responsibilities and having the right tools. This unit will provide our young adults with the tools needed to learn about how to keep their home clean and organized.

The unit stories help young adults learn the importance of coming up with a plan and using the right cleaning tools for the job. In the first story, two roommates need to come up with a cleaning plan that is fair. Together they come up with a plan that tells who will do the cleaning job and when they will do it. In the second story, two roommates go shopping for cleaning tools. They read labels to determine which tools are right for the job. They make sure to look for the best buy when choosing their tools. Three articles offer more information and activities to give our young adults the opportunity to learn about getting rid of clutter and choosing appropriate cleaning tools for different areas of the home.

Regular monthly lessons are provided which offer the opportunity to practice the skills needed to organize and clean a home. Housekeeping needs are addressed in banking and budgeting where the importance of budgeting for needs before spending money on wants is stressed. Daily living skills involved in cooking are part of a regular monthly lesson offering five recipes where our young adults can practice appropriate cleaning skills in the kitchen. Social and communication skills are the focus of lessons presenting daily social trivia scenarios offering more opportunity for our young adults to practice skills needed to keep a home clean.

Employment continues to be a regular focus for several lessons each month. Lessons include exploring different jobs, reading job ads, completing job applications and practicing interview skills. Simple, realistic scenarios address job skills and interactions at work.

Thursday, January 5, 2017

January 2017

The topic of personal safety is presented in this month’s unit titled, “Who Can I Trust?” The unit provides lessons and activities focusing on recognizing unsafe situations and what to do about them. Activities from the Transition Passport: Daily Living/Safety Tools are incorporated. As we assist our young adults in the transition from school to work, it is necessary that they receive training in personal safety. Knowing what to do in unsafe situations, knowing who you can trust and how to stay safe on the internet are important components to personal safety. This unit will provide our young adults with the tools needed to learn about how to stay safe and make safe, responsible choices.

The unit stories help young adults learn the importance of knowing who you can trust and the right to feel safe at all times. In the first story, a young boy is excited about getting money for his birthday and can’t wait to show his friends. He quickly learns which friends he can trust and the importance of keeping personal information and valuable things private and in a safe place. In the second story, a young girl is hanging out with her boyfriend. She likes hanging out with him, but learns the importance of speaking up and saying “NO” when someone or something makes you feel uncomfortable. Her boyfriend respects her feelings and she is able to feel safe and comfortable again.

Regular monthly lessons are provided which offer the opportunity to practice the skills needed to make responsible choices to stay safe. Personal safety needs are addressed in banking and budgeting where the importance of being safe with money is stressed. Daily living skills involved in cooking are part of a regular monthly lesson offering five recipes where our young adults can practice appropriate safety skills when using kitchen tools and appliances. Social and communication skills are the focus of lessons presenting daily social trivia scenarios offering more opportunity for our young adults to practice skills needed to make good choices related to personal safety.

Employment continues to be a regular focus for several lessons each month. Lessons include exploring different jobs, reading job ads, completing job applications and practicing interview skills. Simple, realistic scenarios address job skills and interactions at work. The final lesson highlights volunteering as a way to practice job skills and gain practical work experience.